Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sean Buck and staff hosted a 10th anniversary symposium as a way to celebrate 4th Fleet’s reestablishment, June 1.

The symposium included a panel discussion between partner nation senior naval leadership and former 4th Fleet commanders. The purpose of the panel was to invoke discussion covering common issues shared between the U.S. and partner nation navies. It was also an opportunity for local government and industry leaders who attended to learn about the significant role 4th Fleet plays within the region.

The panel was comprised of admirals from U.S. and partner nations including: Rear Adm. Buck, Rear Adm. (Ret) Sinclair Harris, Rear Adm. (Ret) Victor Guillory, Brazilian Rear Adm. Alexandre Rabello de Faria, Chilean Vice Adm. Ronald McIntyre, Colombian Vice Adm. Evelio Ramírez Gafaro, Ecuadorian Rear Adm. Lenin Sanchez, and Peruvian Rear Adm. Alberto Alcala Luna.

Following the panel discussion, guests toured the 4th Fleet facilities campus and were given a history brief detailing current and past operations.

“In order to know where you’re going, you need to know where you’ve been,” commented Cmdr. Erik Reynolds, 4th Fleet public affairs officer. “Here at 4th Fleet, we have a rich history steeped in building relationships and taking every opportunity to engage with our partners to the south.”

U.S. 4th Fleet was first established in in 1943 to help protect the vital allied shipping lanes in the South Atlantic. Throughout WWII, 4th Fleet is credited with sinking 18 German U-boats, 1 Italian submarine and halted or sunk an uncounted number of axis blockade runners. 4th Fleet was redesignated to Task Force 27 at the end of the war and was not stood back up until 2008 by then Chief of Naval Operations Gary Roughead.

Now, U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command’s joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.

 

Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sean Buck and staff hosted a 10th anniversary symposium as a way to celebrate 4th Fleet’s reestablishment, June 1.

The symposium included a panel discussion between partner nation senior naval leadership and former 4th Fleet commanders. The purpose of the panel was to invoke discussion covering common issues shared between the U.S. and partner nation navies. It was also an opportunity for local government and industry leaders who attended to learn about the significant role 4th Fleet plays within the region.

The panel was comprised of admirals from U.S. and partner nations including: Rear Adm. Buck, Rear Adm. (Ret) Sinclair Harris, Rear Adm. (Ret) Victor Guillory, Brazilian Rear Adm. Alexandre Rabello de Faria, Chilean Vice Adm. Ronald McIntyre, Colombian Vice Adm. Evelio Ramírez Gafaro, and Peruvian Rear Adm. Alberto Alcala Luna.

Following the panel discussion, guests toured the 4th Fleet facilities campus and were given a history brief detailing current and past operations.

U.S. 4th Fleet was first established in in 1943 to help protect the vital allied shipping lanes in the South Atlantic. Throughout WWII, 4th Fleet is credited with sinking 18 German U-boats, 1 Italian submarine and halted or sunk an uncounted number of axis blockade runners. 4th Fleet was redesignated to Task Force 27 at the end of the war and was not stood back up until 2008 by then Chief of Naval Operations Gary Roughead.

Now, U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Command’s joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, forward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stability, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions.